All posts in authorship

16 Posts

Latin America’s violent past in pictures

Francis Hodgson reviews América Latina 1960-2013 Exhibition at Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, Paris.

Hodgson, F.  29 November 2013. Financial Times.
Latin America’s violent past in pictures. [online] Available from
<http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/717aae72-569e-11e3-ab12-00144feabdc0.html#slide0>[Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Francis Hodgson encounter.

Making Pictures of People

Making Pictures of People: Recent perspectives on photographic portraiture exhibition in association with Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

“What compels us to look at pictures of people? When is a photographic portrait successful? Does portraiture tell us more about the person sitting for the camera or the image-maker behind the lens?”

FlakPhoto.com. 2014. [online] Available from
<http://flakphoto.com/exhibition/making-pictures-of-people> [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Andy Adams encounter.

The Future of Photobooks

The Future of Photobooks: A cross-blog conversation, produced by Flak Photo and Miki Johnson.

Adams, A. 2012. Andy Adams Photo.com. The Future of Photobooks. [online] Available from
<http://andyadamsphoto.com/photobooks/> [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Andy Adams encounter.

On the unbound book: academic publishing in the age of the infinite archive

“Developments in electronic publishing contain at least the potential for us to perceive the book as something that is not completely fixed, stable and unified, with definite limits and clear material edges, but as liquid and living, open to being continually and collaboratively written, edited, annotated, critiqued, updated, shared, supplemented, revised, re-ordered, reiterated and reimagined. So much so that, as some have indeed suggested, perhaps soon we will no longer call such things books at all, e- or otherwise.”

Hall, G. (2013) On the unbound book: academic publishing in the age of the infinite archive. Journal of Visual Culture, volume 12 (3): 490-507 [pdf online] Available from https://curve.coventry.ac.uk/open/items/42c3c4f2-c91d-4eb2-a25d-9e1391bc15a4/1/ [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Jonathan Shaw encounter.

Living Books About Life

“Funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), and published by Open Humanities Press (OHP) (http://openhumanitiespress.org), Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life — with life understood both philosophically and biologically — which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. “

Living Books About Life. 2014. [online]
Available from: http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org  [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Jonathan Shaw encounter.

The Photographer’s Eye

The Photographer’s eye, John Szarkowski’s 1964 exhibition of 200 photographs selected to define the unique characteristics of this art form.”

Museum of Modern Art Press Release PDF. [pdf online] Available from http://www.moma.org/pdfs/docs/press_archives/3231/releases/MOMA_1964_0018_1964-05-27_20.pdf?2010 [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Jonathan Shaw encounter.

#phonar

#phonar (an abbreviation for Photography & Narrative) is a free and open photography class offered by Coventry University. It was founded by Jonathan Worth and Jonathan Shaw in 2009.

http://phonar.covmedia.co.uk [Accessed 03 March 2014]

View original context in the Charlotte Cotton encounter.

Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences

“To say that digital cameras have profoundly changed photography is both true and cliché. But few of the regurgitaters of the idea can tell you exactly how. Stephen Mayes, director of VII Photo Agency, is one of those few.”

Brook, Pete. 15 November 2012. Raw File. WIRED.
Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences [online] Available from:
<http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2012/11/stephen-mayes-vii-photography/all/> [Accessed 21 May 2013 18:14]

View original context in the Stephen Mayes encounter.

Why social media is a dangerous concept

“There is a hidden danger in the term social media.  It is dangerous because its name implies it can deliver all the benefits of media, but now with the added engagement opportunities that come with being social.  Media gives us scale, social gives us engagement – put the two together and we can now do engagement at scale.  Fantastic!”

Stacey, Richard. 2013. Richard Stacey. Why Social Media is a Dangerous Concept.
[online] Available from
<http://richardstacy.com/2013/03/28/why-social-media-is-a-dangerous-concept/> [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Stephen Mayes encounter.

Abundant Photography: the misleading metaphor of the image flood

“The metaphor of a flood of images drowning us all has become commonplace in photographic commentary, another of the many conventional wisdoms that shape how we understand contemporary image making and its challenges.”

Campbell, David. (2013) Abundant Photography: the misleading metaphor of the image flood.
[online] Available From
<http://www.david-campbell.org/2013/09/05/abundant-photography-misleading-metaphor-image-flood/> [Accessed 17 November 2013]

View original context in the Stephen Mayes encounter.

James Nachtwey

‘Photojournalist James Nachtwey is considered by many to be the greatest war photographer of recent decades”.
https://www.ted.com/speakers/james_nachtwey

Friend, David. 2013. The Black Slab: appreciation for James Nachtwey’s Inferno). The Digital Journalist [online] Available From
<http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0007/friend.htm> [Accessed 04 November 2013]

View original context in the Stephen Mayes encounter.

Nikon Symposium – Stephen Mayes on Smartphones

“Global Voices: Photography in the 21st Century”. NIKON SYMPOSIUM, Tokyo, 14-15 June 2013.

STEPHEN MAYES. NIKON SYMPOSIUM, Tokyo, June 2013. Stephen on Smartphones [online] Available from <http://www.stephenmayes.co/writings/photography-now-smartphone-update-2013> [Accessed 17 March 2014]

Nikon Symposium Day 2 Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPfvSH1519o#t=4290 [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the Stephen Mayes encounter.

‘Restrepo’ and the Imagery of War interview with Tim Hetherington

Tim Hetherington interview by Michael Kamber for The New York Times.

Kamber, M. 2010. The New York Times. ‘Restrepo’ and the Imagery of War interview with Tim Hetherington [online] Available from
<http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/22/behind-44/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0> [Accessed April 2014]

View original context in the David Campbell encounter.

Fred Ritchin, Bending the Frame: Photojournalism, Documentary, and the Citizen

A revised version of David Campbell’s review of Fred Ritchin’s ‘Bending the Frame: Photojournalism, Documentary, and the Citizen’ (New York: Aperture, 2013) that appeared in Source 76, Autumn 2013.

Campbell, David. 2013. Documentary Photography in the Age of Anxiety Fred Ritchin’s “Bending the Frame” [online] Available from
<http://www.david-campbell.org/2013/11/17/documentary-photography-age-anxiety-fred-ritchin/> [Accessed April 2013]

View original context in the David Campbell encounter.

Photography is dead! Long live Photography

“No, photography is not dead, not by a long shot. All its vital signs are pretty damn good since it mediates our culture more pervasively and effectively than any other visual technology. As curator Linda Michael points out, for artists photography is “more alive than ever . . . as basic as drawing, a source of images, a social index, a voyeuristic device, a means of quick record”.

Miliner, Jacqueline. 2006. Photography is dead! Long live Photography. [online] Available from
<http://www.artdes.monash.edu.au/globe/issue4/pidtxt.html> [Accessed 11 November 2013.]

View original context in the Katrina Sluis conversation.

What’s Next

“For photography, maybe it’s about how photographers no longer have to self-censor or edit themselves because of analogue limitations, such as the number of frames on a roll of film or the cost of a sheet of film. The endlessness of digital capture is actually loosening photography up, and allowing it to be lots of different things, rather than simply a culmination or condensation of something.”

Schuman, Aaron & Cotton, Charlotte. 2011. What’s Next Aaron Schuman & Charlotte Cotton in Conversation. SeeSaw Magazine [online] Available From
<http://www.seesawmagazine.com/whatsnextpages/whatsnext.html>  [Accessed 30 October2013]

View original context in the Charlotte Cotton conversation.

Welcome to the NEWFOTOSCAPES.

Terminology

Catalyst
The impetus for the NEWFOTOSCAPES encounters, Catalysts are the present questions that occupy each collaborator, having guided their current thinking, research and practice. Catalysts can be filtered by theme allowing the community to navigate through and across each encounter, encouraging intersections of contextual relevance.

Encounter
Pre-publication curated transcripts resulting from each discussion with the NEWFOTOSCAPES collaborators. Encounters can be explored directly or via Catalysts and Antennae.

Antennae
Where might the ideas and questions raised during the NEWFOTOSCAPES encounters lead us in terms of a future artistic and professional practice, what further questions might arise and how might we continue these conversations?

Find out more about NEWFOTOSCAPES here.

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